Take Three!

Picture from: equilibriummag.blogspot.com

For this week’s blog I am going to be talking about some learning disabilities and how the students with these learning disabilities learn different. One statement I had to keep in mind while doing my research is, Learning disabilities should not be confused with learning problems which are primarily the result of visual, hearing, or motor handicaps; of mental retardation; of emotional disturbance; or of environmental, cultural or economic disadvantages. Some of the learning disabilities that I looked at his week are, Auditory Processing Disorder (APD), Dyscalculia, Dysgraphia, and Visual Perceptual/Visual Motor Deficit.

Now the ones I chose to talk about are Memory, Non-Verbal Learning Disabilities, and Dyslexia. First of all memory; I knew there were two memories in learning but I never really thought about the third on, which is working memory. The other two are long- term memory and short-term memory. The long term memory is when learning can store information from a long time ago and still recall it.  The short term is when a learner can retain information for a limited time only, (Me in math!) Now the working memory is the ability to hold on to pieces of information until the pieces blend into a full thought or concept. This is an example of reading words and then realizing what the sentence or even possible the paragraph means. All three of these memories work together and that is how we learn things.

Now the ones I chose to talk about are Memory, Non-Verbal Learning Disabilities, and Dyslexia. First of all memory; I knew there were two memories in learning but I never really thought about the third on, which is working memory. The other two are long- term memory and short-term memory. The long term memory is when learning can store information from a long time ago and still recall it.  The short term is when a learner can retain information for a limited time only, (Me in math!) Now the working memory is the ability to hold on to pieces of information until the pieces blend into a full thought or concept. This is an example of reading words and then realizing what the sentence or even possible the paragraph means. All three of these memories work together and that is how we learn things.

The next learning disability is, non-verbal learning.  Students with this disability tend to have trouble interpreting nonverbal cues, such as facial expressions or body language and they may have poor coordination. They also may have troubles with adjusting to change. So in order to help these students it is useful to rehearse getting from place to place, allow the children to abstain from participating in activities at signs of overload, and Offer added verbal explanations when the child seems lost or registers confusion.

The last learning disability is dyslexia. Now before I talk about what dyslexia is, I have a little story to tell. One of my really good friends in high school had dyslexia and because she had this a lot of the teachers would enable her. They wouldn’t allow her to go to class on her own without a teacher with her, she finally asked if she could try and do school with little help as possible, so they let her. A girl who people thought would never be successful or be able to attend college, is now a hair stylist and is doing very well. This is an example of enabling students who have a learning difference and a learning disability. The students are actually capable of learning how to adjust, there needs to be a happy medium. So with that said students who have dyslexia tend to reads slowly and painfully, show wide disparity between listening comprehension and reading comprehension of some text and they may experience difficulty with math computations.

In conclusion students who have learning difference and/or disability aren’t students who need to be enabled but students who need help in how to handle their learning difference and/or disability.

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